Arthritis is a generic term implying joint pain or joint disease. There are different types of arthritis that can affect your health, such as degenerative arthritis, inflammatory arthritis, infectious arthritis or metabolic arthritis.

Degenerative arthritis is also known as Osteoarthritis and is primarily caused by wear and tear of the joints due to age. Inflammatory arthritis is the result of the immune system causing inflammation of joints and surrounding tissues. Infectious arthritis is also known as bacterial or septic arthritis and is caused when a bacteria, fungus, or virus spreads in the fluid surrounding the joint.

The symptoms of all types of arthritis generally include stiffness, swelling, pain, and a reduction in the range of motion. These symptoms usually start as a mild discomfort and gradually get more severe over time.

What Causes Arthritis?

Cartilage, the connective tissue between the joints, is responsible for absorbing pressure and shock during movements. Reduction of cartilage can be caused by obesity, poor nutrition, joint instability, medication, hormonal changes, trauma, or poor spinal alignment. This reduction of cartilage leads to friction between the bones which causes stiffness, swelling, and pain.

When the joint pain is moderate, it can be managed by hot and cold therapies, maintaining a healthy weight, staying active, and strengthening muscles to give support to the joints. These things can offer short-term solutions and relief of pain, but they do not usually completely resolve the arthritis.

Chiropractic Care for Arthritis

Chiropractic care affects the central nervous system as well as the musculoskeletal system, and this makes it an ideal solution for all different kinds of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis is known as degenerative arthritis and results in improper functioning of the joints. Since chiropractic care is known to resolve deficiency due to immune problems as well as restore proper alignment and functioning of the skeletal system, it proposes a viable treatment for all arthritis-related problems.

In a study conducted on 14 patients with hip osteoarthritis, individuals reported a primary reduction in hip pain. Secondary outcomes observed in the individuals were noticed in improved daily functioning with hip-related activities and an increase in participation in sports and recreation.

In another study, a 66-year-old woman who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the age of 18 years was treated with different chiropractic modalities such as spinal adjustments, mobilization, and soft tissue therapies. After just 4 treatments in 7 days, she reported to have sustained relief and was able to pursue her normal activities of daily living.

Chiropractors utilize gentle and specific spinal adjustments to help improve body function and promote a healthier body. Studies have shown that since osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal problem, there is considerable evidence that chiropractic care can help reduce and prevent joint pain and stiffness.

At Greater Life Chiropractic in Charlotte, Dr. Grant Lisetor has helped many members slow down and even stop the progression of arthritis. If you or your loved one is noticing an increase in joint pain or discomfort during joint movements, contact Greater Life Chiropractic for a consultation appointment!

 

Sources

Thorman, P., Dixner, A., Sundberg, T. “Effects of chiropractic care on pain and function in patients with hip osteoarthritis waiting for arthroplasty: a clinical pilot trial.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics, 2010 Jul-Aug; 33(6): 438-44. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20732581/

Chung, C.L.R., Mior,S.A. ”Use of spinal manipulation in a rheumatoid patient presenting with acute thoracic pain: a case report.” The Journal of Canadian Chiropractic Association, 2015 Jun; 59(2): 143-149. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486984/

Dougherty,P.E., Hawk,C., Wiener,D.K., Gleberzon,B., Andrew, K., Killinger,L. “The role of chiropractic care in older adults.” Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, 2012 Feb; v20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306193/